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Month: July 2024

Deborah Pickering Has Walked On: Memorial Celebration Planned In Iowa

A memorial celebration for former Brothertown Peacemaker Debbie Pickering, will be held July 27, from 1 to 4 PM, at the Courtyard by Marriott, 901 Melrose Avenue, Iowa City, Iowa. If you can attend, please contact Steve Bissell here who is coordinating the event.

View more about Debbie’s life and obituary here…

Deborah (Debbie) Pickering (Cedar Rapids, IA) passed on May 28, 2024.  Debbie will be missed and remembered by many. For those not familiar with her, a brief summary of her involvement with the tribe is below:

  • Debbie was a close friend of many and relished speaking to others about her Brothertown heritage. As an educator/PHD college professor, she spent much of her life in the Midwest, but made a point of being involved and supportive of the Tribe.
  • She helped organize the Brotherton Circle.
  • The Brothertown recognition petition to the BIA included Debbie’s interviews with Chair June Ezold, Rudi Ottery, Caroline Ander, and Madeline Crowe.
  • Debbie was also one of our first modern-day Peacemakers
  • She routinely volunteered for things like homecoming, grants, the Progeny initiative, and our first tribal trip to Connecticut and NY lands (1999).

Read Debbie’s report about the tribe’s first group trip to New England and New York in the 1999 Brothertown September Quarterly Report here.

From a grateful Brothertown Tribal Family, all our hearts and feelings are with Debbie’s family and friends at this difficult time.

Dakota saying: “We will be known forever by the tracks we leave.”

Samson Occom Day Celebration! – Zoom presentation on this Founder by Author Ryan Carr

This is a must attend event via Zoom for all Brothertown members and those interested in learning more about one of our founders Samson Occom. Author Ryan Carr has generously agreed to do a special talk on Occom in honor of Brothertown’s annual Samson Occom Day (Sunday, July 14). Ryan’s recent book, “Samson Occom, Radical Hospitality in the Native Northeast,” maintains that Occom’s writings were deeply rooted in Indigenous traditions of hospitality, diplomacy, and openness to strangers as well as Christian themes. By emphasizing the Native sources of Occom’s evangelicalism, Ryan Carr offers new ways to understand the relations of Northeast Native traditions to Christianity, colonialism, and Indigenous self-determination.

This is a fitting and informative way for members to honor Samson Occom Day and learn more about this revered Founder.

Please consider joining us this Sunday at 4 pm CT/ 5 pm ET/ 2 pm PT over Zoom (or telephone) to request Zoom login information, click here: webmaster@brothertownindians.org

About Ryan Carr:
Ryan Carr (Yale, 2016) teaches Indigenous Studies at the center and classes on other topics in transatlantic cultural history. His current research focuses on the Native Northeast and on the intertwinement of settler colonialism with early ideas about secularism. His recent work appears in Critical Research on Religion, New England Quarterly, English Literary History, and other journals. His book on the Mohegan-Brothertown minister Samson Occom, is detailed below.

To learn more or order Ryan Carr’s new book on Amazon: “Samson Occom: Radical Hospitality in the Native Northeast“ (2023) click here to learn more…

Just Published on The Atlantic Magazine…

A Native American Declaration of Independence

This piece written by Ryan O. Carr appeared in The Atlantic July 4, 2024
author of “Samson Occom: Radical Hospitality in the Native Northeast” (2023
)

On November 7, 1785, a group of Native American families gathered in a farmhouse near present-day Deansboro, New York—about 15 miles southwest of Utica—and established a new nation, the first American republic to be founded in the aftermath of the Revolutionary War.

The families derived from seven tribes along the Northeastern Seaboard: Narragansett, Niantic, Groton Pequot, Stonington Pequot, Tunxis, Montauk, and Mohegan. They were united by a common Algonquian language, shared traditions, and a desire to distance themselves from the colonial chaos of their coastal homelands. Their founding moment was recorded in the diary of one of the group’s leaders, a minister from the Mohegan nation named Samson Occom. “Now we proceeded to form into a Body Politick,” he wrote. “We Named our Town by the Name of Brotherton, in Indian Eeyawquittoowauconnuck.” The tribe established a governing committee to be reelected yearly, appointed various officials, and commenced the business of self-government. Soon after, their counterparts in Philadelphia started doing the same under their new federal Constitution.

One of these foundings eventually became much more famous than the other. But as a historian and teacher of early-American culture and politics, I’ve found that knowing about both can upend some common misconceptions concerning the Revolutionary era. The United States founding was undoubtedly a momentous event in world history, but it happened on a continent where other communities were seeking independence at the same time. If the Revolutionary era marked a “birth of freedom,” per President Abraham Lincoln’s famous metaphor, then the United States was not the only baby in the delivery ward.

One of these foundings eventually became much more famous than the other. But as a historian and teacher of early-American culture and politics, I’ve found that knowing about both can upend some common misconceptions concerning the Revolutionary era. The United States founding was undoubtedly a momentous event in world history, but it happened on a continent where other communities were seeking independence at the same time. If the Revolutionary era marked a “birth of freedom,” per President Abraham Lincoln’s famous metaphor, then the United States was not the only baby in the delivery ward.

There are two options to read the entire interesting article:

To learn more or order Ryan Carr’s new book on Amazon: “Samson Occom: Radical Hospitality in the Native Northeast (2023) click here to learn more…